How to Grow Potatoes

Seed potatoes are available both online and in garden centres during late winter and early spring. Martyn Loach passes on a few tips on how to succeed with an easy to grow crop that is also useful for breaking up ground that hasn't been cultivated for a while.

Created by Martyn Loach on Monday, 25th of February, 2013.
Updated on Friday, 10th of February, 2017.


How to grow potatoes

To prevent the spread of disease always buy certified seed potatoes, don't think about planting old ones that you find sprouting at the bottom of your vegetable rack.

Earlies Or Main Crop

Decide whether you want 'Earlies' (first or second) or 'Maincrop'. 'First Earlies' are harvested in early to mid-summer, 'Second Earlies' in mid – late summer, while Maincrop potatoes are dug in late summer and autumn.

Good examples of 'First Earlies' are Arran Pilot, Home Guard, Pentland Javelin, Red Duke of York, Rocket, Sharpe and Swift. 'Second Earlies' are Carlingford, Charlotte, Kestrel, Maris Peer and Wilja. Maincrop include Desiree, King Edward, Majestic, Pentland Crown and Romano.

When the seed potatoes arrive, put them in egg boxes and place in well lit cool position. They will soon start to sprout. If there is not enough light these will be weak and leggy sprouts - what you need are strong, short, bushy green ones.

Planting

Once the potatoes have sprouted and the soil has warmed up to at least 7C, it's time to plant in holes or trenches at least 6ins deep. For 'first earlies' the rows should be 2ft apart and the tubers 12ins from each other, if you are planting 'second earlies' and 'maincrop' potatoes the rows are 2ft 6ins apart and the tubers 15ins apart.

For a better harvest dig in well rotted organic matter before planting the tubers and, to prevent disease, do not grow potatoes on the same patch in consecutive years.

An alternative growing method if you don't have enough room for a vegetable patch, and potatoes do take up a fair amount of space, is to use old car tyres.

Start with a couple of tyres filled with compost and garden soil. Place two seed potatoes on top and cover with more compost. Keep well watered and as the shoots emerge, add more compost and further tyres until the potatoes are ready to harvest.

If any shoots emerge when frost is still expected, cover them up with soil. During the growing season 'earth up' the plants so that the tubers are not exposed to the light and just the tips of the shoots are showing. This also helps to control weeds.

Another way is to buy a Gardman growbag made from heavy duty polypropylene with access flaps for harvesting.

Harvesting

After harvesting, dry, blemish free maincrop potatoes can be stored in hessian sacks in a dark cool environment. I put mine up in the loft.

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