How to Create a Medicinal Garden

More than half of the medicines we use today are derived from plants and Nathan James Dodd recently visited the famous Chelsea Physic Garden in London to gain inspiration for his own medicinal garden.

Created by David Coton on Friday, 22nd of February, 2013.
Updated on Wednesday, 23rd of December, 2015.


Extracts from plants as diverse as foxgloves and pineapples, camellias and artichokes have been, and continue to be used, in many parts of the world.

For example, you're probably more familiar with acetyl salicylic acid than you might think.

Used for over 2000 years, it relieves aches and pains, reduces inflammation and fever, and has evolved from a plant source – willow tree bark - and is the active ingredient in Aspirin.

What Plants To Choose?

The plants I have listed are easily obtainable and not difficult to grow. You'll find many in your garden already.

Whether you grow from seed or plug plants, all that's needed is a relatively fertile, well drained, soil that gets the sun for at least half the day.

You don't even have to grow them together, with good foliage and attractive flowers many will not look out of place in an ornamental flowerbed. 

Try these top ten readily available medicinal plants:

Garlic: Excellent to relieve colds and flu with antibacterial, antiviral and anti-fungal properties

Peppermint: Helps with indigestion and relieves upset stomachs

Rosemary: Eases fatigue, calms digestion and has anti-depressive qualities

Lemon Balm: A relaxant to cure headaches and migraines and now thought to aid memory

Lavender: Has been used to relieve stress and anxiety and a multitude of other ailments

Parsley: A very nutritious herb that is said to help with urinary and kidney problems

Evening Primrose: The oil is used to help menopausal problems and eczema, and may even relieve hangovers

Calendula: Has a long history in the treatment of wounds and soothing the skin

Thyme: Used for intestinal problems, as an antiseptic mouthwash and anti-fungal applications

Echinacea: Said to ward off infections and can also be employed as a laxative

Pots And Planters

They can of course also be grown in window boxes, pots and planters filled with compost, in fact for an invasive plant such as peppermint, this would be preferable.

Container growing is also a good solution if you have limited space. A collection of different sized pots and planters will prove an attractive addition to patio or decking.

Some of the plants and herbs can be continuously harvested while for others it is an annual event. Then you have to decide the best way to use them. 

For many different ideas I can recommend James Wong's book 'Grow Your Own Drugs' which is based on his TV series. 

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