How To Build A 6x4 Small Garden Shed

Last weekend Nathan Dodd was busy constructing a Forest 6x4 Garden Shed for one of our local customers. Here's the story of how the task was completed.

Created by Nathan James Dodd on Tuesday, 8th of January, 2013.
Updated on Wednesday, 24th of February, 2016.


6 x 4 Apex Shed from Forest Garden Products

Following a customer request for a small shed with an apex (high point in the centre and sloping sides) roof, a shiplap (cladding) 6x4 wooden shed was ordered from Gardensite.

Click here to see the 6x4 Forest Shed Specification

How The Shed Arrived

A week later it was delivered directly to the customer's house in several large pieces strapped together and included:

  1. 2 side shed panels, one with a window cut out
  2. A front panel (with door cut out) and back panel
  3. A door
  4. 2 floor panels
  5. 2 roof boards and wooden edging
  6. A roll of roof felt
  7. Perspex window and beading
  8. Bag of screws and fittings (including hinges and a bolt lock).

Tools

I took along my tool box which included:

  • Electric drill and screwdriver (for screwing the sides together)
  • Penknife (for cutting the felt)
  • Hammer (for the window pins and roof felt nails)
  • Step ladder
  • Flask of tea and biscuits (for sustenance)

I had estimated the job would take me around 2-3 hours.

Getting Started

On arriving, my first job was to open the bag and get out the instructions. Never start without reading the instructions, even if your feel tempted to. It's very easy to get something the wrong way round or upside down.

Clearly labelled, I made a start laying out in order all the screws and fittings on the floor. After that, I made space for where the customer wanted me to build the garden shed, then put the sides, roof and floor up against the fence. I then unrolled the roof felt on the lawn. Once I had done this, it made finding everything much easier and I was also able to check that I was not missing anything.

The customer already had a lovely level slabbed area for the shed to be sited on, so that made installing the shed floor very easy. The floor fitted together in two pieces. Made of lightweight reconstituted wood, I was impressed by how solid it was and yet how simple it was to put together.

Window and Door

The customer wanted the shed to store bikes, so it was important to make sure the window was near the fence for security reasons. The great thing about Forest sheds is their flexibility. The sides are interchangeable and the door can open left or right depending on where you locate the door hinges. In this case I made sure the hinges were on the left hand side of the door, so that it opened against the fence to create as much access room as possible.

The next job involved me putting the hinges on the door, whilst the front shed panel was flat on the floor. I thought this might be a job you did once the shed was up, but this way was very straigtforward. The only thing I had to remember was to make sure the screw hinges went into the door battens. If you just put them anywhere then the screws will go through the shiplap door wood and show on the inside. This is not good for strength and can cause injuries. The bolt lock supplied also screwed into the door batons. A padlock is not provided.

Once the door was secure I placed the front panel against the floor and raised it up. It sat nicely on top of the floor in a ridge. I then did the same with the side panel. Now I should say at this point, having two people makes this bit a lot easier. Anything bigger than a 6x4 and I would have needed someone to hold the sides as I screwed them together.

Once the front and sides were erected and screwed together in place, it was a case of adding the back and the other side and screwing them together. Although this all sounds fairy straight forward and it is, it is important to make sure your shed is level and that everything butts together. Once happy with the levels I then screwed the sides down into the base. If you do this too soon, the whole structure won't have any give, which is what you need once all the sides are up to make sure your get everything butted up tightly. Having a level base is the ultimate key to having a level shed.

Next I fitted the clear perspex window which just slotted in. I then nailed the wooden beading aorund the perspex to secure it.

The Roof

The roof section is the most difficult part of building a shed because it involves measuring, cutting and trimming. My dad always says "measure twice and cut once" and that is something always worth remembering.

On this particular shed a wooden baton goes across the top from the front to the back section. The two roof pieces sit on this wooden bar and fit into the side ridges and overhand each side of the shed to create a roof apex. I then screwed them in place making sure each side was equal front and back and side to side.

Having left the roof felt out in the sun it had lost its creases and become flexible. I cut the felt in half and carried one section over to the roof and laid it flat so it over hung over both ends equally, I then tacked it down as instructed. Having step ladders is the only way you can do this effectively.

On this size of shed, the roof felt went over onto both sides of the apex roof. This meant that when I put on the second piece they overlapped each other at the apex by several inches. Again I secured the second piece of roof felt with the roofing nails provided along the sides and top where they overlapped.

To finish the roof off, several pieces of cut batten wood are provided for the front and back to hide the roof felt edge and create a strip of wood to frame the apex roof. Once these are nailed down all I had to to was cut the felt. This is not a easy unless you have a very sharp knife as roof felt is very thick and the tar can quickly blunt the sharpest of knives.

The final job was nailing the four batons that go on each corner of the shed to hide where each panel joins. These really made the shed look neat and tidy.

The End

After three hours it was now time for a cup of tea and to pack up before the rain came.

Further Information

If you are looking to purchase a new shed why not visit our shed product pages on Gardensite.co.uk.

How To Build A Concrete Shed Base For Your Shed

#shed

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